A Little Friday File Fun

In Winfield, West Virginia, a man returned home to find a glass door broken at his residence. After going in, he also found a man asleep in his bed. Responding deputies arrested the man, who was charged with burglary and destruction of property, according to WSAZ-TV.

In Hamburg, Germany, news agency dpa reports that Hamburg’s fire service said it was called to the St. Michaelis church by a man who reported seeing white smoke rising from the tower. Firefighters who rushed to the scene couldn’t see any smoke. They combed the tower before finding the cause of the scare: a large swarm of gnats that apparently looked like smoke from the ground.

In Los Angeles, California, two boys and a girl ages 15, 16 and 17 in a program for those who may want to one day become police officers used a vacationing sergeant’s name to sign out stun guns and radios and drive police cars out of a stationhouse parking lot, the Associated Press reports. Police are investigating whether the teens impersonated officers and pulled over drivers. The three were arrested after two pursuits ended with crashes in South Los Angeles. A third police car was later recovered around the corner from a police station.

In Northampton, Massachusetts, a man complained to the city parking division that he paid $1 to park when he and his wife went out to dinner. According to The Daily Hampshire Gazette, the man said he put the money in a payment kiosk at 6:15 p.m., not knowing the city stops parking enforcement at 6:00 p.m. The mayor sent the man $1 out of his own pocket, along with an apology letter. The man said his complaint wasn’t about his dollar, but about the “thousands of people who have lost the dollar” because they were unaware of city parking rules.

In California, automatically generated report from the U.S. Geological Survey indicated that a magnitude 6.8 quake would occur in the Pacific Ocean 10 miles west of Santa Barbara. However, the alert was about an earthquake that happened in 1925. According to the Huffington Post, newspapers and news agencies had to rescind their alerts. The false alarm may have been generated because researchers from the California Institute of Technology were using new information to analyze the epicenter of the 1925 earthquake in the Santa Barbara Channel.