A Little Friday File Fun

And now it's time for FRIDAY FILES!
By PS

In Manchester, New Hampshire, a woman went to the Hillsborough County Department of Corrections and applied for a job. It was discovered that she had a warrant for a theft-related offense in Maine. So, instead of employment, she received a ride to police headquarters.

 

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, workers renovating the old Dayton’s department store downtown discovered the mummified remains of a monkey. The carcass was found in an air duct on the seventh floor of the century-old building. Cailin Rogers, a spokeswoman for the Dayton’s Project, an office, retail and restaurant complex going into the building, says where the monkey came from or how it ended up in the air duct is a mystery, according to the Associated Press. A co-administrators of an historic site called Old Minneapolis says one likely answer came from someone who posted its Facebook page saying a longtime Dayton’s employee told him a monkey escaped from an eighth-floor pet store into the air conditioning ductwork in the 1960s.

 

In Amsterdam, take the highway past the Dutch village of Jelsum and the road will play you a tune. Reuters reports that the song was created by strategically laid “rumble strips” as a way of livening up journeys across the flat landscape. If drivers hit them at the correct speed—the 60 kph (40 mph) limit—the road will sing out the anthem of the Friesland region. But it is loud and the sound travels, and locals say the musical road had created a never-ending cacophony that keeps them awake at night. The Friesland authority has agreed to remove the rumble strips later this week, local newspaper Leeuwarder Courant reported.

 

In Lindenhurst, New York, a man received a call last week from a man in Oakland, California. The California man’s father had purchased a Volkswagen van new and named it Matilda, taking his family on cross-country trips. The son was cleaning it out after his father’s death when he came across a note from the New York man tucked in the VW’s log book. Eight years ago, at the age of 16, the New York man slipped a note inside the window of the blue 1971 Volkswagen bus, calling it his “future car.” The family of the California man decided to give the van to the New York man, on the condition he update them on its restoration and “go on plenty of adventures.”