Texting a Growing Communication Method Between Applicants and Employers

Although they cite both benefits and pitfalls 67% of hiring managers surveyed by Robert Half use texting to communicate and coordinate interviews with job applicants.

Texting has taken over as a communication method for many aspects of human life, and a survey shows it is now infiltrating the communication between job candidates and hiring managers, especially for IT jobs.

 

Two-thirds (67%) of IT managers use texting to communicate and coordinate interviews with job applicants, a Robert Half survey found. And, nearly half (48%) of employees have used texting to correspond with a hiring manager.

 

Both hiring managers (43%) and employees (44%) say the biggest benefit of texting between job candidates and employers is quick communication. Twenty-four percent of managers and 19% of employees cite discretion, and 22% of managers and 20% of employees say ease and preference is a benefit. However, 12% of hiring managers and 17% of employees say there is no benefit of texting because there is too much room for error.

 

Miscommunication is the biggest downfall of texting between job candidates and employers for both managers (45%) and employees (40%). Twenty-nine percent of hiring managers and 17% of employees say it appears unprofessional, and 16% of managers and 12% of employees say there is too much room for error. In addition, 17% of employees say texting between job candidates and employers is too personal and invasive.

 

“Managers are taking steps to speed up the recruiting process,” said Ryan Sutton, a district president of Robert Half Technology. “Using texting as part of your hiring efforts may mean the difference in getting to your top candidate first and fast, especially at a time when they could be receiving multiple offers.”

 

However, he warned that “this form of communication can have its limitations. Whether you’re looking for a new job or a new employee, use texting wisely—and watch your etiquette.”